Agro-Chemicals New Launch

Insecticides (India), Nissan Chemical Corporation launched Shinwa & Izuki products

Insecticides (India), Nissan Chemical Corporation launched Shinwa & Izuki products
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Insecticides (India), Nissan Chemical Corporation launched Shinwa & Izuki products.

Shinwa (a novel insecticide) and Izuki (a fungicide) have been launched for the Indian market by Insecticides (India) Ltd, a crop protection solutions company, and Nissan Chemical Corporation of Japan.

During a product demonstration here on Monday, Rajesh Aggarwal, Managing Director of Insecticides (India), stated that Shinwa will provide the company with access to a larger market in a variety of crops such as brinjal, okra, chilli, tomato, cabbage, and red gramme.

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‘Shinwa is a novel insecticide that controls lepidopteran pests and Thrips in a variety of crops.’ Shinwa provides better control due to its quick knockdown effect, and its duration of control is also longer than that of other available insecticides,’ he said.

Izuki Fungicide

Izuki is a one-of-a-kind broad-spectrum fungicide that combines two molecules with excellent prophylactic and curative properties. It protects paddy from diseases like sheath blight and blast.

‘Since our collaboration with Nissan began in 2012, we have launched four products: the Pulsor, Hakama, Kunoichi, and Hachiman. With the two new additions, we now have six,’ he highlighted.

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Lepidopteran pests: 

Lepidopteran pests such as Diamond-back moth (DBM) on cabbage (Plutella xylostella), tomato fruit borer (Helicoverpa armigera), pod borer on chilli (Spodoptera litura), shoot and fruit borers on brinjal (Leucinodes orbonalis), and okra (Earias fabia) are some of the most common insect pests on vegetables.

Thrips:

Thrips are tiny, slender insects with fringed wings in the order Thysanoptera. They feed by puncturing the host tissue’s epidermal (outer) layer and sucking out the cell contents, resulting in stippling, discoloured flecking, or silvering of the leaf surface.